Scott Stevenson

University of Houston College of Optometry

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Our research covers many aspects of eye movements and visual function, especially the role of visual processing in controlling reflexive and voluntary eye motion. We use a wide variety of eye tracking instruments, but primarily we use dual Purkinje image trackers and high magnification scanning laser ophthalmoscopes for studying very small changes in eye position.

We also use these technologies to examine clinical cases referred by neuro-ophthalmologists for help in diagnosing a variety of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and cerebellar disease.

 

 

Contact Info:

Scott B Stevenson, Associate Professor of Optometry

2152 JDA Building, College of Optometry

University of Houston, Houston TX 77204-2020

 

SBStevenson@UH.edu

Tel:            713-743-1960

Fax:           713-743-2053

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Frequent Collaborators

Austin J Roorda  / University of California – Berkeley

Jeffrey B Mulligan / NASA Ames Research Center

Lawrence K Cormack / University of Texas at Austin

Rune Brautaset, Maria Nillson / Karolinska Institute School of Optometry

Harold E Bedell / University of Houston College of Optometry

Research Areas

Eye Movements and Retinal Imaging

Visual Processing for voluntary and reflexive eye movements

Psychophysics of depth and motion perception

Our Research Tools

Dual Purkinje image eye tracker

Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope

Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope

Scleral Search Coil eye tracker

Eyelink II video eye tracker

Custom video analysis tools for off-line eye tracking

Cambridge Research Systems VSG boards

Image Systems multisync CRTs

NEC LCD projectors

Macs. PCs. Matlab. Visual Basic

Over the years our work has been sponsored by:

National Institutes of Health / National Eye Institute

National Science Foundation / Center for Adaptive Optics

Alcon Research Ltd.

University of Houston GEAR grants program